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The blog of PEGALIS & ERICKSON, LLC: a medical malpractice law firm in Long Island representing those suffering from injuries caused by medical errors. Contact us for a free legal consultation today.

National Minority Health Month

Unfortunately, not all Americans can count on receiving the same quality of medical care. April is National Minority Health Month, a time to familiarize oneself with the discrimination that minorities may experience in healthcare.

Findings from the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports highlighted the discrepancy between the levels of care received by underserved groups such as minorities, those in rural areas, and the poor, in comparison to other people: African-American received worse medical care than Caucasians for about 40% of measures. Hispanics received worse care than non-Hispanic Caucasians for approximately 60% of measures, and Asians receive worse care for about 20% of measures. Those in poverty received worse care that high-income individuals for approximately 80% of measures.

Further, according to recent research about minorities and medical care, many feel brushed off or condescended to by their healthcare providers. The results can be delayed diagnoses, worse prognoses, and evens death. If you belong to an underserved population group, it is all the more critical that you keep careful records of the treatment you receive from healthcare professionals. Take the initiative to ask for tests that are recommended for your age and condition.

If you are concerned about a diagnosis made later than it should have been, a misdiagnosis, or serious errors in medical treatment, contact the New York law firm Pegalis & Erickson, LLC. We advocate for people of all ages and backgrounds and help our clients successfully resolve their cases for financial support and to make healthcare safer for all. You can reach us today by calling (516) 858-2194.

Diabetes Alert Day

Raise your awareness of Type 2 diabetes in time for #Diabetes‏ Alert Day. Diabetes affects more than 10% of the U.S. and one out of four adults with diabetes aren’t aware they have the disease. Another 84 million Americans have prediabetes, but 90% of them don’t know it yet. Many people are unaware of the serious health problems associated with diabetes, so it is important to learn if you are at risk of developing diabetes.

There are two kinds of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stop producing insulin, which regulates blood sugar. With Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces too little insulin or the body’s cells are not responding properly to insulin. Both types of diabetes can lead to dangerous conditions, such as heart disease, vascular disease and stroke, eye damage, kidney damage, and hard-to-treat infections, Have you told your doctor about any risk factors you have such as family history of diabetes? Your age, extra weight and a sedentary lifestyle should all be considered. Tell your doctor immediately if you have diabetes symptoms such as frequent urination, itchy skin, fatigue, hunger, dry mouth, and blurred vision. Your doctor can help determine the right screening and treatment plan..

As with many health issues, early detection is key to controlling diabetes, and this starts with a correct diagnosis. If your doctor failed to diagnose your diabetes or pre-diabetes and you suffer serious permanent harm, it is a good idea to obtain a legal consultation. Our legal team has more than 45 years experience in patients’ medical malpractice lawsuits, and can help you determine the truth, with no fee. For more information, or to schedule your free consultation, give us a call today at 516-858-2194

Patient Safety Awareness Month

March is Patient Safety Awareness Month, which means that it’s an excellent time to highlight the importance of taking precautions as a patient against potential medical mistakes. While it is the responsibility of all medical practitioners to uphold the highest standards of safety in order to protect their patients, patients can also do their part to minimize the risk of harm. Going for regular check-ups, keeping track of your symptoms, having a list of allergies and current medications on hand whenever you visit a medical facility, asking plenty of questions, and getting a second opinion when necessary are all ways that you can help to keep yourself safe as a patient.

If you are concerned about a misdiagnosis or possible medical error, contact the law firm of Pegalis & Erickson, LLC in New York. For 45 years, we have advocated for people of all ages, in order to help our clients financially and make healthcare safer for everyone. You can reach us today by calling (516) 858-2194.

Steps to Take If a Diagnosis Is Inconclusive

When you have a clear-cut diagnosis, your course of action may seem clear. What happens, however, when your diagnosis is inconclusive? Living with an uncertain medical verdict can be extremely stressful, because you may have no way of knowing when you will get a more conclusive diagnosis. A recent study found that as many as 12 million people in the United States get an inconclusive—or faulty—diagnosis annually. Here are some steps to take after you have received an inconclusive diagnosis:

Be proactive, not passive.
Many patients assume that the medical practitioners who see them always know best, and that they are always in safe hands. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. By being an active, engaged, and informed patient, you can help to ensure that you get quality care.

Seek out a second opinion.
If your first diagnosis was inconclusive, it goes without saying that you should try again. Go to a different doctor for a second consultation. To ensure objectivity, it’s best to avoid telling this doctor what the first diagnosis was, at least until you have received the second opinion.

Talk to your primary care physician.
You should always start by seeing your usual doctor, who will have a better sense of your overall health than anyone else will. While your diagnosis may be made by a specialist, it’s still important to keep your primary care physician in the loop.

Keep yourself informed.
In today’s world, it’s easier than ever for patients to get educated about their health and get the accurate information they need to make smart choices. Always do your research before going to any medical practitioner so you’ll be better equipped to ask useful questions.

If you are concerned about a misdiagnosis or possible medical error, contact the law firm of Pegalis & Erickson, LLC in New York. For 45 years, we have advocated for people of all ages, in order to help our clients financially and make healthcare safer for everyone. You can reach us today by calling (516) 858-2194.

Spotlight on Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is a type of cancer that originates in either the colon or the rectum. It generally starts as a polyp in the large intestine that eventually develops into cancer. Unfortunately, colorectal cancer does not typically present many noticeable symptoms in its early stages. This is why regular screenings are critical if you are over the age of 50, which is when your risk of colorectal cancer is highest. People who have gastrointestinal issues such as Crohn’s disease or who have a family history of the disease are at a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Blood in the stool, unexplained weight loss, and chronic fatigue are some of the most common warning signs of this cancer.

If you are concerned about a misdiagnosis or possible medical error, contact the law firm of Pegalis & Erickson, LLC in New York. For 45 years, we have advocated for people of all ages, in order to help our clients financially and make healthcare safer for everyone. You can reach us today by calling (516) 858-2194.

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